How many people actually use JavaScript as a functional programming language?

Answer on @Quora by Vladislav Zorov to How many people actually use JavaScript as a functional programming language?  The big exception to the above are people writing reactive JavaScript, using libraries like RxJS or Bacon. They are writing functional JavaScript, and no amount of nitpicking can deny that (except if you bust out the "static type system" argument, which IMHO isn't a very good argument).  P.S. "Imperative" is not the opposite of "functional"; "imperative" is the opposite of "declarative", and "functional" is the opposite of "procedural". JS can be, with the above in mind, in the "imperative-functional" quadrant, like Lisp, and unlike Haskell (which is "declarative-functional"). But it's normally "imperative-procedural".

Answer by Vladislav Zorov:

As a functional programming language? I suppose almost nobody. Sure, a lot of people pass functions around, but this alone doesn't make it functional programming. If you want FP, you have to at least get a library like Underscore, seeing how JavaScript doesn't actually support FP out-of-the-box (it only has things like map, filter, etc., but these are present in any modern language, even Java).

The big exception to the above are people writing reactive JavaScript, using libraries like RxJS or Bacon. They are writing functional JavaScript, and no amount of nitpicking can deny that (except if you bust out the "static type system" argument, which IMHO isn't a very good argument).

P.S. "Imperative" is not the opposite of "functional"; "imperative" is the opposite of "declarative", and "functional" is the opposite of "procedural". JS can be, with the above in mind, in the "imperative-functional" quadrant, like Lisp, and unlike Haskell (which is "declarative-functional"). But it's normally "imperative-procedural".

How many people actually use JavaScript as a functional programming language?

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